Animals living in landscapes used intensively by people travel, on average, only half to one-third as far as animals in more remote areas do—a pattern that's consistent across dozens of species worldwide. The finding, published today in Science1, has implications for important ecological processes linked to animal movement, such as seed transport

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Old-growth forests can provide a refuge for heat-sensitive birds as temperatures rise across the Pacific Northwest, according to new research.   Ancient forests tend to provide moderate temperatures compared with their surroundings, potentially buffering some of the sharpest impacts of climate change, said Matthew Betts, a professor at Oregon State University.   With that

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The last year has been a political whirlwind, to put it mildly. Donald Trump’s presidency has triggered tectonic shifts in numerous areas of government, and science and health care have been no exceptions. Just after the election Scientific American predicted Trump’s tenure would have widespread effects on environmental policy, climate

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Wildfires are still raging across southern California, marking the end of a destructive year of extreme weather events around the world. In the U.S. alone historic floods hit Missouri and Arkansas in May, drought parched the Dakotas and Montana from spring through fall and autumn hurricanes ravaged the U.S. Gulf

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BONN, Germany—A White House roundtable on fossil fuels and nuclear energy became an outlet for international rage at President Trump, who has disdained the world's work to contain climate change.   Yesterday's event, hosted by White House energy adviser George David Banks, didn't offer the same level of defiance shown by Trump

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